Crooks Garden featured in November 15, Seattle Times.

"Plant a garden you will enjoy from the inside," by Valerie Easton


 Crooks Garden featured in The Best of Fine Gardening


 Sunset Western Garden Book of Landscaping - 2014


Crooks Garden highlighted in Sunset Magazine.

April 2013
Read the Sunset story: "12 great foliage border plants" click here.


Stacie's garden is featured on the cover of the January issue of Fine Gardening.

Stacie Crooks' Garden

Stacie Crooks                         

Banner photo by David Perry.





Crooks Garden featured in Fine Gardening, summer 2015.


Download the article here.

Stacie Crooks is a nationally recognized Seattle-based garden designer and educator. Her work has been published in the Seattle Times, Sunset, Horticulture, Seattle Homes & Lifestyles, Seattle Metropolitan and Fine Gardening. Her work appears in books written by Valerie Easton, Julie Moir Messervy, and Marty Wingate and several Sunset books.

For the past twenty years Stacie has designed gardens and landscapes from small residential gardens to large formal estates throughout the Pacific Northwest. She specializes in drought-tolerant, low-maintenance, environmentally friendly garden and landscape designs.

Stacie also teaches workshops and classes in her garden to the public for Seattle Public Utilities and to private horticultural groups.

She has served on the Board at the historic Dunn Garden for 10 years and is currently serving as a trustee for the Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island.

Stacie is affiliated with the following organizations: Bloedel Reserve, Northwest Horticultural Society, Pacific Horticultural Society, Historic Dunn Garden, Bellevue Botanical Garden Society, Northwest Perennial Alliance, Garden Conservancy and the American Horitcultural Society.

 Crooks Gardens is featured in 2015 Sunset Western Garden Book of Easy-Care Plantings.



Fine Gardening, December 2014


Stacie takes comfort in knowing that her pioneering design philosophy is beginning to inspire some to try a different way of gardening. Dwindling water supplies and global warming may influence others. “Eventually, everyone will have to garden the way I do – they won’t have a choice,” she says. Lucky for us, she proves sustainable can be beautiful too.  - Debra Prinzing